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Fort St. John
Tuesday, December 11, 2018
Tel: 250-787-7100
Email: contact@energeticcity.ca
9924 101 ave Fort St. John, B.C.
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PM Justin Trudeau ‘seriously’ reviewing Premier Christy Clark’s thermal coal ban request

VANCOUVER, B.C. – On April 26, Premier Christy Clark sent a letter to Prime Minister Justin Trudeau asking the federal government to ban the shipment of thermal coal, including U.S. shipments through B.C. in response to the U.S. government and their announcement that they would be adding duties to Canadian Softwood Lumber and now it appears Trudeau is examining her request.

According to an article by the Canadian Press, the Canadian government is set to announce potential action, to be taken if necessary.

Another measure could be possible duties against Oregon industries. Democratic senator, Ron Wyden’s home state is Oregon. He has been a ‘hardliner’ on the lumber dispute.

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Clark released a statement on Friday, thinking the Prime Minister for looking into her proposal.

“I would like to thank Prime Minister Trudeau for his quick action to look at banning thermal coal exports through British Columbia and his commitment to stand up for B.C. and Canadian forest workers.

Prime Minister Trudeau and I share a commitment to securing a new, long-lasting softwood agreement that protects jobs and workers in B.C.

We also share a desire to reduce global reliance on dirty thermal coal as a source of electricity.

Banning thermal coal exports through B.C. ports stands up for forest workers and helps fight climate change.

If I am re-elected Premier on May 9th, I will continue to work constructively with Prime Minister Trudeau to secure a fair softwood agreement with the United States.”

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