QuickQuotes: what’s being said about the end of TransCanada’s Energy East

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Here’s how some are reacting to TransCanada’s decision to cancel the Energy East pipeline:

“We are deeply disappointed by the recent decision from TransCanada. We understand that it is driven by a broad range of factors that any responsible business must consider. Nonetheless, this is an unfortunate outcome for Canadians. Our government has supported Energy East since the project was proposed. We believe this nation-building project would have benefited all of Canada through new jobs, investment, energy security and the ability to displace oil being imported into Canada from overseas and the United States.” — Alberta Premier Rachel Notley

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“Both the Northern Gateway fight and this Energy East one show that when First Nations stand together, supported by non-Indigenous allies, we win…So that’s two tar sands expanding mega-pipelines stopped in their tracks but it will be a hollow victory if either Kinder Morgan, Line 3 or Keystone XL are allowed to steamroll over Indigenous opposition and serve as an outlet for even more climate-killing tar sands production.” — Grand Chief Serge Simon of the Mohawk Council of Kanesatake on behalf of the Treaty Alliance Against Tar Sands Expansion

“We’re disappointed. We supported the Energy East pipeline because it would have provided supply options and access to western Canadian crudes for our Montreal refinery and also would have provided access to new markets which is critical for Canadian producers.” — Sneh Seetal, spokeswoman for Suncor Energy

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“We still do not have a regulatory process that gives clear certainty to companies…I think the whole greenhouse gas upstream-downstream issue coming in and being put on the table by this panel was just another example of, OK, what next? It really wasn’t in the purview of that panel to do that.” — Chris Bloomer, CEO of the Canadian Energy Pipeline Association

“The message from today’s cancellation of TransCanada’s proposed Energy East pipeline is loud and clear: new tar sands pipelines don’t make sense – economically or environmentally – in a world that is addressing climate change and moving away from fossil fuels. The reason for Energy East’s cancellation is simple: New pipelines can’t be justified during a time of declining investment in the tar sands, North American pipeline overcapacity, and an unstoppable transition to renewable energy.” — Environmental Defence campaigner Patrick DeRochie

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“This is a sad day for Canada. The construction of the Energy East pipeline was a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity. This was a $15-billion private-sector investment that would have enabled further investment and development in our country, creating thousands of skilled jobs and generous tax revenues and royalties for all levels of government along with creating energy security for our country.” — Ian Whitcomb, President of Irving Oil.

“The Building Trades regrets the opportunities that have been lost in Atlantic Canada, Québec, Ontario and on the Prairies. What have been lost are high quality, high paying jobs in all of those regions on the construction of this world-class, nation building project.” — Robert Blakely, operating officer of Canada’s Building Trades Unions 

 

The Canadian Press

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