Global BC: Construction at Site C to continue

A rendering of the Site C dam. Photo by BC Hydro

VANCOUVER, B.C. – Global News is reporting construction of the Site C Dam will continue.

During the Sunday evening news on Global B.C., reporter Keith Baldrey said senior officials within government have told him, that construction will continue.

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The official announcement will come Monday at 12:30 p.m. Mountain time (11:30 a.m. Pacific).  Energeticcity.ca will carry the press conference live on our Facebook page.

On Sunday, B.C. Green Party Leader suggested a recall should happen if the Energy Minister, Michelle Mungall, changes her position on the dam.  In 2016, the Minister said she was against the project.  A recall wouldn’t be possible until at least 18 months after the May 2017 election.

The Peace Valley Landowners Association and the Peace Valley Environmental Association have announced they will hold a press conference before the Premier at 10:30 Mountain time to critique what they call the flawed process and information on which Premier Horgan, Finance Minister Carole James, Energy Minister Michelle Mungall, and the NDP cabinet and caucus are expected to base their imminent decision to proceed with Site C.

The $9 billion dollar project is expected to be finished in 2024, but a report released by the BCUC at the end of November predicts the cost could increase to over $12 billion and that construction is already behind schedule.

Experts from both sides of the debate have released outlines of why or why not to build Site C. Robert McCullough, a leading energy expert retained by the Peace Valley Landowner Association, released a report in Vancouver outlining why BC Hydro ratepayers would be better off cancelling the project – despite an estimated loss of $4 billion. For the same cost of building Site C, McCullough estimated that B.C. could either build 15 hospitals, 94 schools, or 25,000 new homes in the Vancouver area.

The Allied Hydro Council of BC  released a report in November, that reached the opposite conclusion. Economist Marvin Shaffer and lawyer Jim Quail argued that the project is “past the point of no return”.

 

 

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