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If B.C. doesn’t back down Canada should cut their funds, says Alberta Opposition leader

Alberta Opposition leader and former Immigration Minister Jason Kenney, shown during Question Period in the House of Commons on January 31st, 2011 accusing Palestine House of having “a history of taking positions that could be interpreted as extreme or supportive of terrorists and terrorism.” Photo by Adrian Wyld/The Canadian Press
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OTTAWA, O.N. — Pressure is mounting on the federal government to use money or the Constitution to back up its claims that the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion project will be built, no matter what.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s cabinet is in Ottawa today for an emergency meeting following news that Kinder Morgan is suspending all non-essential spending on the pipeline until it and its investors feel secure the project won’t fall apart amid strong opposition from the British Columbia government.

Jason Kenney, leader of Alberta’s United Conservative party, says since Trudeau had no qualms withholding more than $60 million from Saskatchewan for not joining the Liberal carbon tax plan, he should follow suit by withholding transfers to B.C. for blocking a pipeline it has no jurisdiction over.

B.C. Premier John Horgan says he will do whatever it takes to keep the pipeline from being built and has threatened to use regulations to stop additional oil from flowing through the line even if it is built.

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The Vancouver Board of Trade also said today Trudeau has to sit down with Horgan and Alberta Premier Rachel Notley immediately to solve the impasse or exert Canada’s jurisdiction through other means.

Natural Resources Minister Jim Carr says Canada will consider financial, legal and regulatory options, but insists the government has approved the pipeline in the national interest and, one way or another, he says it will be built.

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