Rain helping fire crews battling Lutz Creek Fire near Lower Post

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WATSON LAKE, Y.T. – Firefighters with the BC Wildfire Service are getting some help from Mother Nature in the battle against the Lutz Creek Fire, which is burning near Lower Post.

The fire, which merged with the nearby Blue River Fire last week, now sits at an estimated 100,799 hectares, roughly 5,000 hectares less than the previous estimate.

The Wildfire Service says that danger tree removal is ongoing while machine guards are now complete on the north bank of the Liard River in the Lower Post area.

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There are currently 51 firefighters, two helicopters, and eight pieces of heavy equipment battling the fire, while three Type 1 fire engines are also assisting with fire suppression in the community.

Just south of the Lutz Creek Fire is the Johnny Creek Fire, which has ballooned to 156,775 hectares in size.

Northwest Fire Centre Information Officer Joanna Brunsden said that while not much is separating the two fires, neither is forecast to see much growth as over 40 millimetres of rain has fallen in the area over the past two days.

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The same can’t be said for other areas of the province, which has now officially experienced its worst wildfire season on record.

So far this year there have been nearly 2,000 wildfires across B.C. that have burned an estimated 1.295 million hectares of forests.

The previous worst year was 2017 when 1.22 million hectares went up in flames.

Fire Information Officer Amanda Reynolds with the Prince George Fire Centre said that of the nearly 2,000 wildfires this year, nearly 1,500 have been sparked by lightning.

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