Province introduces new law to help clear minor accidents faster

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Adam Reaburn
Adam Reaburnhttps://energeticcity.ca/
Adam moved to Fort St. John in 2004 and he now owns both Moose FM and Energeticcity.ca

VICTORIA, B.C. – The Province of B.C. has changed the rules to help police clear accidents faster.

Currently, officers who attend a property-damage-only collision must complete a written report before any vehicles can be removed from the road if damage exceeds $1,000 (for motorcycles, $600; for bicycles, $100).

The Province has now increased that threshold to $10,000 per property-damage-only collision regardless of the vehicle type.  

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“Having traffic back up because of a minor collision where nobody was hurt doesn’t help anyone – and worse, it can lead frustrated drivers to take steps that are unsafe,” said Mike Farnworth, Minister of Public Safety and Solicitor General. “Today’s increase in the damage threshold for these kinds of crashes is long overdue and will allow people and police officers to move damaged vehicles out of the way without delay.”

The threshold increase is effective Friday, March 8, 2019. Police will continue to file a mandatory, written report with ICBC for every crash they attend that results in death or injury.

“Police officers will continue to attend collisions involving minor property damage at their discretion – for example, if questions arise about driver impairment or who’s at fault,” said Chief Const. Neil Dubord, chair of the B.C. Association of Chiefs of Police traffic safety committee. “However, lifting the threshold for mandatory, written reports when officers do attend will help clear crash scenes much more quickly. In turn, it may lower risks for those working at the scene and motorists alike.”

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