Geoscience BC Open House in Dawson Creek

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DAWSON CREEK, B.C. – An open house is being held in Dawson Creek by Geoscience BC regarding a new project to assess the potential amplification of ground movement around Fort St. John and Dawson Creek.

Join Geoscience BC staff and lead researcher Dr. Patrick Monahan to learn more about the project at the open house on the evening of Wednesday, May 29, 2019, from 5:30 pm to 7:00 pm at the Kiwanis Performing Arts Centre – Meeting Room 1, 10401 10 Street, Dawson Creek.

The event is free and open to anyone to attend. , light snacks and non-alcoholic drinks will be provided, register for the event; CLICK HERE

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Geoscience BC shares they have launched a new project to assess the potential amplification of ground movement associated with earthquakes generated by hydraulic fracturing and fluid injection in an area around Fort St. John and Dawson Creek.

According to Geoscience BC, the project addresses public concerns relating to seismicity and oil and gas industry activity in northeastern BC, especially in areas close to communities and infrastructure. The project will examine how seismic waves from earthquakes can potentially be amplified in specific shallow geological conditions.

Lead researcher Dr. Patrick Monahan said, “Most recent studies in this area have focussed on the reduction of ground motion as you get further from the seismic event. But seismic ground motions can also be amplified significantly on sites underlain by certain sediments, compared to sites on bedrock or firm ground.”

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Geoscience BC Executive Vice President and Chief Scientific Officer Carlos Salas said, “The new science generated by this project will help us better understand which areas have the potential of increased ground motion during induced seismicity events associated with natural gas extraction. The information can be used by industry, regulators, communities in the Peace River Regional District and Indigenous groups to improve industry procedures to manage felt events.”

 

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