Palliative care in Canada less of a priority during coronavirus pandemic, experts say

Must Read

Mudslide on the South Taylor Hill

UPDATE - As of 9am the hill is open in both directions. FORT ST....

13 new COVID-19 cases in BC, 14 days of self-isolation still mandatory

VICTORIA, B.C. – 13 new cases of COVID-19 were confirmed across the province, bringing British Columbia’s total to 2,947,...

Construction of a temporary road into the Old Fort could start this weekend

FORT ST. JOHN, B.C. - Construction of a temporary road into the Old Fort could start as...

When Kathryn Butler Malette learned her younger sister was diagnosed with COVID-19, she was confronted with a waking nightmare: that her beloved sibling might die alone.

While Ontario’s government has said facilities can allow end-of-life visits, Butler Malette said she was told the Ottawa-area long-term care home where her sister lives didn’t want to chance it, given the magnitude of the outbreak they were experiencing.

“I was there when my mother passed away. I was holding her when she passed away. And the thought that I could not be there for my sister, I couldn’t bear it. I could not bear the thought of it,” she said.

- Advertisement -

Community Interviews with Moose FM


Experts and insiders say that palliative care, which focuses on comfort, has become less of a priority during the COVID-19 pandemic, primarily due to visitor restrictions and even bans born out of staffing shortages and a need to limit exposure to the virus.

Story continues below advertisement

But some say it’s time to loosen those restrictions and find a balance between keeping everyone safe and allowing dying patients to say goodbye to their loved ones.

Butler Malette’s mother had also lived in that same long-term care home until her death last year,

 » READ MORE FROM GLOBAL NEWS

More Articles Like This